Son of God?

Hatred is not good. Vengeance is not good. Division is not good. We approach these things as if they are a part of human nature. We are not violent. We are not greedy. We are not evil by nature. They are things that are taught to us in exactly the same way as we have learned everything in our lives, from spelling and subtraction to walking and playing the piano. Practice, repetition, and endless belief in the fact that we should do something endlessly to make sure we can do it without thinking.

That’s where the idea of tradition comes from. We say change is bad. We say modernization is bad. We fight against it not because there is something particularly good or spiritual or even enjoyable about the way things have been but we are afraid of changing in case we don’t like what it’s changed to. more...

A Festival of Love

We need a new festival. Christianity is a way of life, a faith system, where none of its recognizable dates corresponds directly with its central teachings. So again I say this. The Church is in desperate need of a new festival. We must create a celebration of love. Now before this is brutally twisted for the purpose of misunderstanding, I should clarify that I don’t mean a festival of sex, lust, and pursuit. We already have a solid ongoing celebration of culturally-enshrined reverence for the sanctity of male-privileged right to physical pleasure and domination. Some people abbreviate that to “marriage”. Others call it physical misogyny but that’s a discussion for another day. What I want to talk to you about is why “take back Christmas from Santa” and “reclaim Easter from the chocolate bunnies” are silly and unnecessary because, simply put, they are missing the point and we don’t have a time of celebration of the central argument of the faith — unyielding and unquestioning love of all humans. more...

SheSaysMcr

Amid long nights and ice, I was overjoyed to see a full house turn up for SheSaysMCR’s first event of 2019. For a few hours, we were able to forget the noise of the insignificant details of our daily routines and think about some of the more serious issues facing us, from the unseen face of stereotype as self-fulfilling to looking at mortality as an open discussion space.

Tech diversity activist Annette Joseph [@diversenett] began the night’s presentation schedule by sharing her experience growing up in a racially-segregated Leeds on the receiving end of stereotype and a complete lack of expectation. Being in a community of liberal thinkers, mostly women and often from, if not visible, definitely identifiable minority groups, we sometimes allow our activism for inclusion to take on the aura of “racism is nearly dead” but what we heard was a story of subtle decisions to back up a conservative white-dominant agenda, perhaps one that is so engrained that most don’t even know they are supporting it. more...

Write with me

I run a publication project for short stories and poetry called Write Me Away and we’re looking for submissions. Interested in sharing something with us? Take a look…